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2010 Census Frequently Asked Questions

Q. Who should fill out the census questionnaire?
A. The individual in whose name the housing unit is owned or rented should complete the questionnaire on behalf of every person living in the residence, including relative and non-relatives.

Q. How will the 2010 Census differ from previous censuses?
A. In 2010, every residence will receive a short questionnaire of just 10 questions. More detailed socioeconomic information previously collected through the decennial census will be asked of a small percentage of the population through the annual American Community Survey. To learn more about the American Community Survey, visit www.census.gov.

Q. How are census data used?
A. Census data determine the number of seats each state will have in the U.S. House of Representatives. Census data also can help determine the allocation of federal funds for community services, such as school lunch programs and senior citizen centers, and new construction, such as highways and hospitals.

Q. What kind of assistance is available to help people complete the questionnaire?
A. 2010 Census questionnaire language assistance guides are available in a variety of languages. Local Questionnaire Assistance Centers will also assist those unable to read or understand the questionnaire. Large-print questionnaires are available to the visually impaired upon request, and a Teletext Device for the Deaf (TDD) program will help the hearing impaired.

Q. How does the Census Bureau count people without a permanent residence?
A. Census Bureau workers undertake extensive operations to take in-person counts of people living in group quarters, such as college dormitories, military barracks, nursing homes and shelters, as well as those who have been displaced by natural disasters.

Q. How do you tell the difference between a U.S. Census worker and Con Artist?

THIS IS PRETTY BASIC ADVICE;š
Be Cautious About Giving Info to Census Workers by Susan Johnson

"With thešU.S.šCensus process beginning, the Better Business Bureauš (BBB) advises people to be cooperative, but cautious, so as not toš become a victim of fraud oršidentity theft. The first phase of theš 2010šU.S.šCensus is under way as workers have begun verifying theš addresses of households across the country. Eventually, more thanš 140,000šU.S.šCensus workers will count every person in thešUnitedš Statesšand will gather information about every person living at eachš address including name, age, gender, race, and other relevant data.

The big question is - how do you tell the difference between ašU.S.šCensusšworker and a con artist? BBB offers the following advice:
If ašU.S.šCensus worker knocks on your door, they will have aš badge, a hand held device, ašCensus Bureau canvasšbag, and aš confidentiality notice. Ask to see their identification and theirš badge before answering their questions.š However, you should neverš invite anyone you don't know into your home.

Census workers are currently only knocking on doors to verifyššaddress information.š šDo notš give your Social Security number, creditš card or banking information to anyone, ševen if they claim they need itššfor the U.S.šCensus.š

REMEMBER, NO MATTER WHAT THEY ASK,š YOU REALLY ONLY NEED TO TELL THEMšHOW MANY PEOPLE LIVE AT YOURš ADDRESS.

While the Census Bureau might ask for basic financial information,š such as a salaryš range , YOU DON'T HAVE TO ANSWER ANYTHING AT ALL ABOUTššYOUR FINANCIAL SITUATION.š The Census Bureau will not ask for Socialš Security, bank account, or credit card numbers, nor will employeesš solicit donations.š Any one asking for that information is NOT withš the Census Bureau.
šš
AND REMEMBER, THE CENSUS BUREAU HAS DECIDED NOT TO WORK WITH ACORN ONššGATHERING THIS INFORMATION.. šš No Acorn worker should approach youšš saying he/she is with the Census Bureau.

Eventually,š Census workers may contact you by telephone, mail, or inš person at home. šHowever, the Census Bureau willš not šcontact you byš Email , so be on the lookout for Email scams impersonating the Census.

Never click on a link or open any attachments in an Email that arešsupposedly from thešU.S.šCensus Bureau."

For more advice on avoiding identity theft and fraud, visitšš www.BBB.org š
šš
PLEASE SHARE THIS INFO WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS.